David J. Caruso

David J. Caruso

David J. Caruso

Director, The Center for Oral History

  • Phone: 215.873.8236
  • Fax: 215.629.5236

David J. Caruso’s current work explores the relationship between government and private funding and the development trajectories of biomedical research in the United States from the end of the 20th century through today. He received advanced degrees in science and technology studies from Cornell University, where he cultivated an interest in the history of the theory and practice of American military medicine before, during, and after World War I, as well as the creation, dissemination, and use of automated external defibrillators in the mid- to late 20th century. He received his undergraduate degree in the history of science, medicine, and technology from Johns Hopkins University.  

In his position as program manager in the Center for Contemporary History and Policy, Caruso is working on expanding the breadth and depth of CHF’s oral history collection in order to make it useful to those interested in the history and contemporary studies of science, medicine,and technology broadly, and he is also working with his staff on different ways in which to bring the history of science to a more general, science-minded audience. These interests form the core principles of CHF’s Oral History Program, which develops projects to understand better various aspects of the scientific life and the lives of scientists, while at the same time expanding the collection of oral histories housed in the Othmer Library.  

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Active and Previous Projects 

Recent Presentations 

  • Panel Organizer: “Paradigm Shifts in Scientific Knowledge and Practice: Using ‘The Truth’ to Settle Scientific Debates”; and “Talking with Scientists: Using Oral History to Document the History of Science.” Oral History Association. Atlanta, GA, October 2010.
  • “Practicing Biomedical Science in an Age of Scientific Decline: Government Funding, Private Foundations, and Biomedical Science.” American Association for the History of Medicine. Rochester, MN, April 2010.
  • “Medical Officers and Military Command Structures: The Disciplining of American Military Medicine.”

 

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