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Hot and Bothered

"By the decade of the 2030s, we see persistent, drier conditions over most of the U.S.," predicts Stanford University's Noah Diffenbaugh in a new report published in Geophsyical Research Letters.

Translation: Heat waves like one suffered by much of the country last week are likely to appear with alarming frequency in the coming years.

Aside from personal discomfort, such extreme temperatures are downright dangerous for humans. They'll also be responsible for lengthy droughts, depressed crop yields, and raging wildfires. 

As scientists and policy experts struggle to find solutions to this problem, one tool in their arsenal is climate engineering, as discussed in a recent episode of CHF's podcast Distillations.Take a listen, and decide if bending the weather to the will of man is worth the risk.

Posted In: Policy | Technology

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