Media

Archives

Categories

Contributors

Subscribe Subscribe:

Blog Archive

CHF staff and scholars provide a behind-the-scenes guide to activities at CHF, with reflections on science education, provocative explorations of chemistry in the wider world, and much more.

This page holds archived blog posts. Visit our Tumblr page to see recent content and to join the conversation.

All posts in education

Why Are For-Profit Companies Philanthropic?

One very mainstream school of thought says a corporation’s principal duty is to maximize return to shareholders. Taken literally, this means that companies would never give money to charitable organizations because it subtracts from the bottom line.

Read More ›

Posted In: Education

Periodic Table Fancy

The periodic table has become engrained in pop culture.

Read More ›

Posted In: Education

Science & Art: Hand-in-Hand

What’s the difference between science and art? In the former, if a discovery isn’t made by one person, if it’s important, it will surely be made by another. In art, a work not created by an artist will likely never exist at all.

Read More ›

Posted In: Education | History

Science, Evidence, Belief

“Faced with the choice between changing one’s mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof.” So said economist John Kenneth Galbraith.

Read More ›

Posted In: Education | Policy

Talking to Each Other

Scientists charmingly believe that if “the public” merely hears the discovered truth, it will be logically applied in all matters of public policy and personal behavior. If only….

Read More ›

Posted In: Education | Policy

Talking About Science

If you ask the mythical person-on-the-street for a definition of science, you’d probably get something like, “a body of knowledge about the physical or biological world.” My dictionary chimes in with “a branch of knowledge dealing with a body of facts on the natural world.”

Read More ›

Posted In: Education

Here We Go Again

With depressing regularity we are treated to reports of the scientific illiteracy of our fellow citizens. One such salvo comes from the National Center for Education Statistics.

Read More ›

Posted In: Education

The Age of Wonder

Richard Holmes’ book, The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science, is witty, charming, inspiring, and highly recommended. So is the author, as I learned firsthand at a lecture he delivered at CHF last week.

Read More ›

Posted In: Education | History

Science Report Card

Every two years the National Science Board produces a detailed report on the state of U.S. science, engineering, and technology. The new 2010 version can be found here.

Read More ›

Posted In: Education

Did You Like High School Science?

Chances are that anyone reading a blog called Periodic Tabloid will have good memories of enjoying high-school science classes. A fondness for high-school science isn’t universally shared, however. Sadly, there are people who harbor a negative association with their high-school science experience. Can this be changed?

Read More ›

Posted In: Education