SCI Gordon E. Moore Medal

The Society of Chemical Industry (SCI), America Section, awarded the 11th annual SCI Gordon E. Moore Medal to Andrew Taggi, senior research associate, DuPont, at a luncheon in his honor during Innovation Day 2014. The luncheon, held September 16 at the Chemical Heritage Foundation (CHF) headquarters in Philadelphia, was a joint event hosted by SCI and CHF, which gathered more than 150 leading researchers from industrial laboratories to discuss current trends and issues in chemical research.

Andrew E. Taggi is an expert in the field of fungicide research and discovery. Using his knowledge of organic and agricultural chemistry, he has combined complex protein binding pockets, field-biology efficacy, toxicology, and environmental fate to design and prepare over 900 new molecules, resulting in the development of candidates with drastically improved biological activity and safety. For the past five years Taggi was the principal chemist and project team leader for a program that has discovered and optimized a new broad-spectrum cereal, fruit, and vegetable fungicide, which has a new mode of action distinct from all current commercial products. Taggi is an inventor on eight patents, filed globally, in this program alone. The total addressable market space for this project is over $6 billion.

Last year the world’s population surpassed 7 billion, and it is projected to exceed 9 billion by 2050. Right now roughly 1 billion people are undernourished, with global crop inventories at all-time lows. With the global population rising faster than arable land becomes available, farmers must improve their productivity, and fungicides have become an integral part of efficient food production. New compounds help farmers compete in an environmentally sustainable way so that food is affordable and available.

Taggi is a senior research associate at DuPont Crop Protection’s Stine-Haskell Research Center in Elkton, Maryland. He has an impressive record of patents (19 published, 12 in preparation) and publications. His body of work was recognized by the American Chemical Society at the 2009 Young Industrial Investigators Symposium in Washington, DC. Taggi received a BA in chemistry from Cornell University and a PhD in organic chemistry from Johns Hopkins University.

Past SCI Gordon E. Moore Medalists:

  • Jerzy Klosin (2013)
  • Dean Rende (2012)
  • Doron Levin (2011)
  • Emmett Crawford (2010)
  • Emma Parmee (2009)
  • Edmund M. Carnahan (2008)
  • Paul A. Sagel (2007)
  • Jonathan M. McConnachie (2006)
  • Jeffrey John Hale (2005)
  • George Barclay (2004)

About the SCI Gordon E. Moore Medal

The Society of Chemical Industry (SCI) has established the SCI Gordon E. Moore Medal to recognize early-career success in innovation, as reflected both in market impact and improvement to quality of life. By highlighting extraordinary individuals and their work, SCI aims to promote public understanding of research and development in modern chemical industries, enhance the interest of students in applied chemistry by providing role models, and emphasize the role of creative research in the global economy. For more information, see SCI Gordon E. Moore Medal on the SCI Web site.

The Society of Chemical Industry, America Section, is a CHF Affiliate.

Hear It Firsthand

CHF’s Center for Oral History captures and preserves the stories of notable figures in chemistry and related fields. Many of the oral histories in the collection belong to recipients of CHF awards, including

 

Support CHF

Help us preserve and share the history of chemistry and related sciences. Make a tax-deductible donation online.