Science on Tap

Science on Tap
Date: December 9, 2013
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Location:

National Mechanics
22 S. Third Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106

Event Type: Open to the Public
Fee: Free
RSVP Online: No Registration Required

Science on Tap is a monthly gathering that features a brief, informal presentation by a scientist or other expert followed by lively conversation. On December 9 Charles Delwiche will present “The Good, the Bad . . . the Algae?”

Although often thought of as nuisance organisms, algae are vital to everyday life. The term algae refers to a set of distantly related organisms that are united by their capability for oxygen-evolving photosynthesis. Often neglected, these organisms include the primary producers that dominate oxygen production and carbon dioxide consumption worldwide. Many are fascinating and beautiful (albeit microscopic) organisms, and studying them can give clues to the earliest evolution of life on Earth, and suggest strategies for coping with some of the world’s most pressing problems.

Charles Delwiche is professor (and affiliate of the Department of Biology and Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics) at the University of Maryland. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. His research interests focus on understanding the early evolution of photosynthetic life, and he would like to understand why of all the possible worlds, we got the one we have. His laboratory at the University of Maryland uses both classical and genomic techniques to study chloroplasts as endosymbiotic organelles, the origin of land plants from green algae, and the diversification of all forms of life, particularly dinoflagellates.

Presented by the American Philosophical Society Museum.

Open to the public (age 21+ or accompanied by chaperone 25 years or older).

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